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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Format of Takbeer on the Two Eids

https://islamqa.info/en/158543

In Eid prayer for Eid al-Adha, I hear people repeat Takbeer (saying “Allah Akbar” in Arabic) the following phrases:
Allaahu akbar, Allaahu akbar, Allaahu akbar, laa ilaaha ill-Allaah, Allaahu akbar, Allaahu akbar, Allaahu akbar, wa Lillaahi’l-hamd. Allaah akbar kabeera, walhamdulillaah katheera, wasubhan Allaahi bukratan waaseela, Laa ilaaha ill-Allaah wahdahu fulfilled his promise wa nasara ‘abdah wa a’az jundah wa hazama al-ahzaaba wahdah Laa ilaaha ill-Allaah wa la na’budu ila Iyah mukhliseena lahu’l-deena wa law kariha’l-kaafiroon). They repeat this after each prayer (from the daily 5 prayers), is that true? If wrong, what is the correct phrases to be repeated instead?.

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King James of the KJV Bible was a Homosexual

https://etb-history-theology.blogspot.ca/2012/03/king-james-was-gay.html

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Bart Ehrman on Christian Literacy in the First Century

Several significant studies of literacy have appeared in recent years showing just how low literacy rates were in antiquity. The most frequently cited study is by Columbia professor William Harris in a book titled Ancient Literacy. By thoroughly examining all the surviving evidence, Harris draws the compelling though surprising conclusion that in the very best of times in the ancient world, only about 10 percent of the population could read at all and possibly copy out writing on a page. Far fewer than this, of course, could compose a sentence, let alone a story, let alone an entire book. And who were the people in this 10 percent? They were the upper-class elite who had the time, money, and leisure to afford an education. This is not an apt description of Jesus’s disciples. They were not upper-crust aristocrats.

In Roman Palestine the situation was even bleaker. The most thorough examination of literacy in Palestine is by a professor of Jewish studies at the University of London, Catherine Hezser, who shows that in the days of Jesus probably only 3 percent of Jews in Palestine were literate. Once again, these would be the people who could read and maybe write their names and copy words. Far fewer could compose sentences, paragraphs, chapters, and books. And once again, these would have been the urban elites.

Source: Ehrman, Bart D. (2012-03-20). Did Jesus Exist?: The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth (Kindle Locations 702-712). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

Can the ‘Heretical’ Church Fathers be trusted?

Many Christians are satisfied with the claim that if all the Biblical manuscripts did not exist, they could rely on Church fathers to reconstruct the Bible.

Now we have already shown that even if we take the assertion that the Church fathers and their quotations can be trusted both as a source of knowledge,(and their authenticity) , we still wont be able to get a Bible until the fourth century

An upcoming post, will question the authenticity of the Church Fathers writings themselves, and can they rightly be attributed to their respective authors.

This post, however, will assume for the sake of argument that these writings are authentic to their respective author. But it will question whether we can rely on such authors to quote the Bible.

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Clarification by Wallace on Using Patristic Witnesses to Re-Construct the New Testament

Calling Christians

Many evangelical Christian apologists use an argument attributed to the Executive Director of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts, which goes as follows:

We can almost completely restore the New Testament off of the early church fathers alone.

This argument posits that based on the writings of the early Church Fathers (Patristics), in their quotations, we can use those quotations of the New Testament to reconstruct the entire New Testament. However, as Dr. Dan Wallace clarifies, this is not a claim he makes, and he specifically qualifies that although such a reconstruction can be done, it cannot be done using the early Patristics:

cc-2015-wallaceonpatristictc

As Dr. Ehrman points out, this cannot be done using the early Patristic writings (1st to 3rd centuries). Unfortunately, this is quite a popular argument used by Christian apologists, and it’s long overdue that either Dr. Wallace or Dr. Ehrman corrected lay…

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